Types of Meetings

Many different meetings occur in business between managers and employees. The most typical meetings can be categorized as firefighting meetings. Firefighting meetings occur on an ad hoc basis to solve specific problems such as: 1. Customer X did not get the right product 2. Machine number 6 is not functioning properly; etc. The purpose of these meetings is simply to resolve issues. Issues discussed are hot topics that need to be resolved immediately. A Progress Meeting is not this kind of firefighting meeting. Another type of meeting is a departmental meeting. In this type of meeting, participants shuffle into a conference room and sit around. Someone speaks and updates on various issues. Frequently, people’s attention wanders off and they do not pay attention. They might look like they do but they actually are not and may well be texting and the like. At the end of the meeting, everyone shuffles out of the conference room and scurries off to their next meeting. This process repeats. A Progress Meeting is not that kind of meeting. Then there is the yearly appraisal process with associated meetings. This is least celebrated and underappreciated type of meeting that goes on in organizations. In fact, in most organizations it is downright hated. Typically this meeting occurs at the end of the year. It entails the Manager evaluating the employee’s accomplishments and skill development. This process turns into a bureaucratic chore pushed by HR so that they can update their records. Most of the time the employees’ goals were not tracked or discussed during the year; thus the appraisal is often incomplete and inaccurate. The...

A Keyne Way to Coach Employees and Improve Performance

I have run my own business and coached employees for years but the whole notion of calling meetings between Employee and Manager “Progress Meetings” is something I learned from Wayne. Most of this material comes out of my collaboration and association with Wayne Nelsen and the Keyne Method. Wayne is the president of Keyne Insight, a firm dedicated to identifying and proving the concepts of execution management. He is also the creator of KeyneLink; a cutting edge execution management system that is used by many companies globally. The distinction between progress meetings and all other meetings is simple and elegant and makes all the difference in changing the context of the meeting. The meeting is not an appraisal meeting where the manager is judging the accomplishments or lack thereof. A progress meeting is a formal opportunity to review, reflect, and give feedback on the progress that the employee is making on their goals. More on this in the next couple of blog posts. Learn more about KeyneLink and Progress Meetings...

A Very Keyne Way to Set Goals Continued

Last week we defined goals according to the Keyne Method.  This week we continue to outline the process. Tension often exists between setting realistic goals and stretch goals. The Keyne Method creates a breakthrough solution for this issue; when outlining goals, define the criteria for meeting the goal, exceeding the goal, and missing the goal. The exceeded criterion allows you to create a realistic stretch goal. Almost everyone likes to produce results beyond their set goals. I noticed that my clients who follow this process focus on exceeding the goals. This method also forces you to really think about your goal. It is such a simple concept. It works quite elegantly. Of course, each target of meeting, exceeding, and missing needs to be quantifiable. Here is an example: Goal: Attain $10 million in new sales revenue for 2019 Score   Definition   Missed   Attain $9 million or less in new sales revenue for 2019   Met   Attain $9-11 million in new sales revenue for 2019   Exceeded   Attain $11 million or more in new sales revenue for 2019 We encourage our clients to set goals in partnership with their manager. Employees that set goals with their managers really create alignment. It allows employees to define what they are actually committing to and allows managers to understand and agree to those commitments. I love this aspect; it is very powerful and positive.  As I said previously, all goals have clear measurable results with a target date. Target dates ensure achievement of goals. Can you imagine a goal that said Company X will attain $250 Million Net Profit...

A Very Keyne Way To Set Goals

Goals are where the rubber meets the road. Goals create high performance organizations. Goals create accountability. Goals have clear measurable results with a target date. A side note; much of the philosophy of this article is taken from the Keyne Method which was created by recovering strategic planning consultants Wayne and Kelly Nelson. They are also the developers of KeyneLink; a cutting edge execution management system that is used by many companies globally. The Keyne Method categorizes goals into four types: individual, departmental, developmental and team. In today’s post we will look at each of these in more detail.  Next week we will continue discussing the Keyne Method of goal setting. Individual Productivity Goals • Represent how each individual will be involved in meeting the corporate initiatives • Are totally within your power; nobody else is involved • Example:  An individual sales goal Department/Management Goals • The department’s or group’s contribution to a corporate initiative • The manager’s productivity goals for the department • Example:  Keeping the sales motif in mind: the sales department will attain 10 million in new sales revenue for 2019 Professional Development Goals • Goals that advance an employee in his or her professional development • May be related to leadership skills, technical skills, specific job-related skills, or the like. • Examples: Graduating with an MBA by 2019, completing a course/seminar by 2019, attending a conference in 2019, etc. Developmental goals are really positive; knowledgeable employees are more valuable to the company and better suited to drive the corporate initiatives forward. All of our clients mandate that every employee including the CEO have at least one developmental...